Curb Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

Addiction to opioids is almost becoming common in the United States today. Furthermore, with the opioid epidemic our country has been going through for decades now, it seems people don’t think that much about someone with opioid addiction. That is unless the person with the addiction is either you or someone you love. The question is, can buprenorphine curb opioid withdrawal symptoms?

Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

The fact is, overcoming opioid addiction is not easy. The hardest part of getting off of opioids is the withdrawal symptoms you must endure. Of course, if you have been addicted to opioids for a long time or are taking high doses of this drug, the withdrawal symptoms will be worse. Some of these symptoms include but are not limited to:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Excessive sweating
  • Mood swings
  • Irritability
  • Restlessness
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Teary eyes
  • Muscle aches and pains

When these symptoms subside, more severe and longer lasting withdrawal symptoms appear.

These can include:

  • Fatigue
  • High blood pressure
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Diarrhea
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Paranoia
  • Vomiting

After a few days, these symptoms start to go away, and after about a week or so, you should be feeling much better.

How can You Curb Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms?

Going through withdrawal symptoms from prescription opioid medication is just the same as going through withdrawal symptoms from heroin. Comparatively, one is just as bad as the other. It doesn’t matter if one is a prescription, and the other is an illegal drug. The fact is they are both opioids and dangerous drugs.

Once an individual is ready to stop using opioids because of the addiction factor, how do they find a way to curb opioid withdrawal symptoms? There are different ways that doctors can help you. Furthermore, some medications can assist you and curb your withdrawal symptoms. One of these medications is buprenorphine.

What is Buprenorphine?

Buprenorphine is in a class of drugs called mixed opioid agonist-antagonists. Physicians use it in the treatment of opioid addiction. As a matter of fact, this drug helps to lessen opioid withdrawal symptoms. Specialists use it along with counseling and behavioral therapies for those addicted to opiates or opioids. “When used as prescribed, buprenorphine is safe and effective.”

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved buprenorphine in October of 2002 for clinical use. This drug is the first medication that physicians are permitted to prescribe or dispense from their offices. Buprenorphine is not like methadone, which medical professionals must administer in approved clinics.

How does Buprenorphine Work to Curb Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms?

Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist. It does produce effects of euphoria, but they are weaker than with other drugs such as methadone or heroin. This drug’s opioid effects improve with each use until they level off even if you increase the dosage. This effect lowers the risk of side effects, dependency, and any other type of misuse.

Some of the side effects of buprenorphine include:

  • Insomnia
  • Constipation
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Cravings
  • Muscle aches and cramps
  • Irritability

Seek Help for Addiction to Opioids

If you are abusing or addicted to opioids, seek help from an inpatient addiction treatment facility. Don’t continue with the ups and downs of opioid addiction. Not to mention, these are dangerous drugs. An inpatient addiction treatment facility such as New Beginnings Drug Rehab can help you with the detoxification.

We will keep you as comfortable as possible with a safe withdrawal period. New Beginnings Drug Rehab can help curb opioid withdrawal symptoms. Furthermore, we can get you into therapy and counseling sessions after you are free from the toxins of opioids.

Contact one of our informed representatives today to learn more about our facility and the treatment programs that we offer. They can answer any questions you may have. Additionally, our team can design a treatment program that is tailor-made for your needs and preferences. Contact us today!

Resource:

samhsa.gov – Buprenorphine

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